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bud-lightEveryone and their mother has been going red in the past few days in support of marriage equality, including several high-profile brands — Bud Light, Smirnoff, Absolut…we’re sensing a trend here.

Others have remained silent on the issue, but a new Tumblr is forcing companies out of the closet. Brand Equality features dozens of brand logos stylized with the Human Rights Campaign’s red equal sign — giving the assumption that they support marriage equality.

Brands have the option to say nothing and let the assumption ride; confirm their support; or request that their logo be removed, implying that they do not support marriage equality.

A sort of “public shaming,” if you will; or complete transparency, if you won’t.  However, as Business Insider notes, it’s possible that these brands “don’t allow for their logos to be reproduced for legal, trademark or intellectual property reasons.”

Either way, these four brands asked to have their logos removed. Brand Equality has replaced their original comments (below) with the more equitable — “So, do these brands want to be removed? Or to replace the image sent in with a ‘neutral’ stance? Just let us know. This is all about transparency.”

exxon

Exxon is the first company to receive a negative score from HRC’s Corporate Equality Index, and “is the only U.S. employer that has ever rescinded both a non-discrimination policy covering sexual orientation and domestic partner benefits, and is the only Fortune 10 company that does not have a non-discrimination policy covering sexual orientation.”

urban

Urban Outfitters briefly removed — only to restock –T-shirts supporting gay marriage from its stores, and donated 100% of sales to pro-marriage equality groups. The retailer, however, most recently caused outrage with a “closet tranny” card. Meanwhile, president and founder Richard Hayne infamously donated $13,500 to ultra-conservative anal sex byproduct Rick Santorum over the years.

wal-martWal-Mart recently added trans protections to its employee non-discrimination policy, however, the mega-chain has a history of rolling back the courtesy with regards to the LGBT community, including: CEO Mike Duke signing a petition in 2008 to prevent Arkansas same-sex couples from adopting; allegedly demoting an employee and forcing him to wear a yellow vest after he came out; and receiving a 40 out of a possible 100 on HRC’s Equality Index.

chick-fil-a

We think it’s pretty safe to assume that this one legitimately doesn’t want to be associated with gay marriage, no matter how many free waffle fries it shoves down your throat.

Whether shamed or exposed in the name of transparency, do you think these brands want to purposefully distance themselves from marriage equality? Sound off in the comments.

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